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Project Honey Pot Http:BL WordPress Plugin

This plugin is no longer supported/updated. Please see Project Honey Pot Http:BL is going back home.


Today I would like to announce the release of “Project Honey Pot Http:BL” WordPress Plugin.

Description

This plugin allows you to verify all visitors’ IP address against the Project Honey Pot database. Using the Http:BL API, this plugin flags, logs, and blocks visitors with a high threat score, helping you prevent harvesters, spammers, or other suspicious bots from abusing your blog. I’ve been talking a lot about LoJack anti-spam measures lately and this is one of them.
This plugin requires you to sign up for a free account at Project Honey Pot so that you can use their Http:BL API to verify your visitors.
This plugin is based on Jan Stepien’s http:BL version 1.4 which is no longer being supported. This version of the plugin fixes a lot of database bugs and usability issues that the original plugin had. Here are the key benefits of having this plugin enabled.

  1. LoJack anti-spam solution with collective intelligence
  2. Easy Project Honey Pot integration. No need to mess with Apache mod_httpbl, which means that this will work on shared hosts.
  3. Ability to redirect malicious bots to a bot trap.
  4. Logging capabilities

Read on…

iPhone 2 (3G) compared to gPhone compared to WordPress?


I’m sure everybody now knows that the iPhone 2 (3G) is going to be released on July 11th, 2008. I asked a buddy if he would prefer to wait for the gPhone over the iPhone 2 and he humorously responds:

“too unproven”
“too designed by committee”
“like open source”
“don’t want no open source microwave”
“don’t want no open source phone”
“try to make food in open source microwave you find out you need to compile the dependencies for popcorn separately first”

WordPress, being an open-source software, is the most popular blogging platform out there. Why is this? Because it addresses the average Joe’s concerns of open-source software.
Read on…

Comments Were Broken Recently. It’s Fixed Now.


For those who have tried to comment on my posts but were not able to, I would like to sincerely apologize. If you are a returning reader/commenter, thank you for your patience and your continued reading loyalty. I would also like to thank Agam Rosyidi for notifying me that my comments were broken on this blog. In the future, if you notice anything wrong with my site, I would greatly appreciate it if you let me know via my about page.
On the actual problem itself, it turned out that WP-SpamFree was not working with WP-Super-Cache when the cached page is being dynamically delivered. I did not look too much into why this was the case, but comments now work after disabling WP-SpamFree. I have removed this plugin and I don’t plan on re-enabling WP-SpamFree in the future or making it work with WP-Super-Cache because of the philosophies in this great paper by Mark Pilgrim. I highly recommend reading this timeless article before you think about combatting spam. Read on…