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A Quick Guide to Changing WordPress Hosts

In this post I will show you how to quickly migrate a WordPress blog to a different host. Certainly not everybody’s configurations are the same, so this should be used as a general guideline only.

Trasloco in corso
photo credit: zio Paolino

Put your site in maintenance mode

Move files and data

  1. Login to your current host via SSH and cd to the directory above your blog root
  2. Run the following command to archive your WordPress code:
    tar -zcvf blog.tar.gz path/to/your/blog/
  3. Read on…

Weekend Links – Jan 1, 2009

Weekend Links – Dec 5, 2008

  • How did I reduce CPU overhead problem caused by MySql? – From last day, We were having problem with a project which was shut down in the middle due to heavy traffic. As a technical manager, I was t…
  • Feed for Drafts (Plugin) – We are already working with four WPEngineer – …
  • wordpress google checkout – How to integrate Google Checkout with WordPress? A simple enough question!
    I decided to test the two obvious routes for flexibility, time, a…
  • What I Like Most About WordPress 2.7 So Far – When I launched the all new jDidIt.com a few weeks ago, I decided to take my chances and roll forward with the latest Beta of WordPress 2….
  • How to: Deny comment posting to no referrer requests – To achieve this recipe, simple paste the following code on your .htaccess file, located at the root of your WordPress install. Don’t forget …
  • Read on…

Completed OMNINOGGIN Server Migration

Server Migration
I apologize if you have visited earlier today and found the Maintenance-Mode screen. I was moving this blog from a self-hosted dedicated server to a shared-hosting server. In this post, I will discuss the reasons for my decision and the switching experience.
Here are some reasons why I made the switch (Pros):

  1. I’ve been getting more readers lately so my bandwidth was almost reaching capacity. Shared-hosting is the cheapest way to get decent burstable bandwidth.
  2. I wanted to start focusing more on WordPress and less on FreeBSD. Making this switch will alleviate me from having to maintain/troubleshoot low-level system things, leaving me with more time to focus on WordPress development & discussion.
  3. Read on…

Creating a Staging WordPress Blog for Testing

Over the past few months, I’ve been meaning to create a staging WordPress blog that is an exact replica of my production OMNINOGGIN blog so I can test major feature changes before releasing them to my production site.  I have to admit that there are many other interesting things to spend time on (see also: Make Popularity Contest Work with WP-Super-Cache and NowThen Photo Display WordPress Plugin) so I have been lagging at getting this task done.  Fortunately the WordPress 2.5 released was enough to motivate me to get this done.  My goal in this post is to provide a step-by-step set of instructions (or checklist) for getting this task done.  I run Apache 2.2.8, MySQL 5.0.51a, and PHP 5.2.5 on a FreeBSD 7.0 machine that I have complete control over.  Keep in mind that these steps will vary depending on how your blog is configured.  It is a good checklist nonetheless so without further ado:

Read on…

Recapping: Setting up a FreeBSD 6.2 Web Server

I hope I can get some part-time consulting jobs to do this optimization for small businesses. All in all, it doesn’t seem too hard to do and I enjoyed doing it. If you run into a problem just google it for the answer. Anyway, here is the recap of the steps I took to set up my FreeBSD 6.2 Web Server.

  1. Installing OS
  2. Setting Up Apache, MySQL, and Other Services
  3. Migrating WordPress from WinXP to FreeBSD
  4. Optimizing Apache
  5. Optimizing MySQL
  6. Optimizing PHP
  7. Proxy Caching
  8. Optimizing WordPress with WP-Cache
  9. Keeping Your FreeBSD Ports Up-to-Date Effortlessly
  10. Setting Up Sendmail on FreeBSD 6.2

Setting up a FreeBSD 6.2 Web Server: Proxy Caching (Part 7)

Okay I lied, eAccelerator gives a pretty darn high ROI, but setting up a proxy cache gives a comparable or higher ROI. I chose to use Varnish as my proxy cache.

Once installed, Varnish will keep a cache of all objects requested by internet users (e.g. post-generated PHP pages, CSS, javascripts, images) with the goal of off-loading some work from your web server (remember: we won’t want big Apache to do the work only if it has to). Also Varnish takes full advantage of the OS’s virtual memory and advanced I/O features on FreeBSD 6.x making it the optimal choice for my setup.

There were many confusing instructions on the web about how to configure Varnish. Here are the steps I took to setting up Varnish for a signal machine running both Varnish and the web server: Read on…

Setting up a FreeBSD 6.2 Web Server: Optimizing MySQL (Part 5)

Similar to Apache, you do not want MySQL to start hogging all the memory in your system. To configure your MySQL settings, open your /etc/my.cnf file for editing. Under the [mysqld] section of the file modify the following variables: Read on…

Setting up a FreeBSD 6.2 Web Server: Migrating WordPress from WinXP to FreeBSD (Part 3)

Background

I previously made a an awfully painful choice to host this site on my WindowsXP machine using WAMP (FYI, WAMP = Windows, Apache, MySQL, PHP packaged into one install). WAMP and I had a 10-month-long love-hate relationship: Read on…

Setting up a FreeBSD 6.2 Web Server: Apache, MySQL, etc (Part 2)

I admit that I cheated, but since I’m newbie in FreeBSD, I am allowed to follow another very nice tutorial on deploying a server found on Open Addict. My job is not to recite the tutorial to you. Instead I will comment on the tutorial’s instructions and point out any roadblocks I ran into during my installation process. Read on…